Cultivate Wonder

Exploring Science with Children

My Anatomy

For our final week of summer session Wonderworks, we learned all about the parts of our bodies and how they work together to make us who we are.

After our opening song, Energy, by Nancy Stewart, we all took a moment to stop and feel how quickly our hearts were beating (it is a long song with a lot of movement). We talked about our day’s theme and allowed our heartbeats to return to normal, and then, we tried to feel them again.  We noticed that our hearts had settled down and were no longer beating as rapidly.

We read our two books back to back, beginning with Tedd Arnold’s very humorous picture book, Parts. Next, we moved on to the very engaging and informative beginning reader Fascinating! Human Bodies, by Katherine Kenah. This was an excellent book for our theme, as it not only discussed some of the different parts of the body – internal and external, but also introduced fun facts that the children really enjoyed. We learned that like fingerprints, the iris of each human eye is unique. We also learned that the longest case of hiccups lasted 69 years!  If you are interested in teaching preschool age children about the inner workings of the human body, I highly recommend this pairing.

book Collage

 

After we finished our books, we did two songs with bean bags. First, we did the popular Beanie Bag Dance from Greg and Steve’s Kids In Action album. In this song, the children dance along to the music while cues in the song tell them on which body part to put their bean bag. The second song that we did was a much quieter song and one that we’ve never tried before, called Up Goes the Castle.  It is sung by Ernie from Sesame Street. In this song Ernie instructs you to lie on the floor and put your hands on your stomach (I asked them to lie on the floor and place their bean bags on their stomachs), and then as he sings the song (which is about a castle moving up and down on a mountain), the children watched their beanbags as they rose and fell on their stomachs. Before beginning this song, we talked about how our lungs got bigger and smaller when we breathed in and out.  We practiced breathing in and out and noticing how our chests got bigger and smaller. *I must be honest, I was worried that the children would have a difficult time staying still and would move around or get up before the song had ended; however, they did not. Over twenty children all remained on their backs with their bean bags on their bellies for a song that was 3:30 seconds long. I will definitely use this song again.*

For our activity, I made packets of organs and skeletons (from the website: Confessions of a Homeschooler: Life Size Human Anatomy Activity) for the children and their adults to cut out together and to arrange and glue on to large sheets of butcher paper. I had examples hanging up so that they would know where everything should go (basically). The adults were able to first trace an outline of the children in crayons, and then, they cut out the organs, colored and labeled them and glued them into place. This was actually a much more time consuming activity than I had anticipated, and so the overall storytime, which is ordinarily 45 minutes (including activity) went over by an additional 45 mintues (I had nothing going on in the room after, so this was not a problem, but if you are on a stricter schedule, you might want to schedule more time or to make this as a take home activity).

organ collage

As far as our Wonderworks program goes, I would say that this was probably one of my favorite themes.  It was not only fun but also very educational.  The books were enjoyable and engaging, the the songs were fun and relevant, and both the children and their adults had a great time working together on the activity.

I hope you all are enjoying your summer! We’ll be back again soon when Wonderworks fall session begins at the end of August. Feel free to contact Robin Gibson or myself, Jen Thomas, anytime. We’re always happy to share ideas and get to know other individuals interested in STEAM programming.

 

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